Homemade (Paleo) Mayonnaise

March 16, 2015

Homemade (Paleo) Mayonnaise




You certainly don’t need me to tell you how to make mayonnaise.
You might need me to tell you how to make Homemade Sriracha or Homemade Ketchup, and tell you not to go to a chinese place to pick up a food delivery order you placed online: "I had a delivery" "Why are you here, then?" [DUMB]
Mayonnaise though...I’m sure you can handle that on your own.
Maybe I just need to remind myself how to make mayonnaise. And that mayo is a simple emulsion made of just oil, egg yolks and either vinegar or lemon juice. There’s no place for water, HFCS, sugar, modified corn starch, dried eggs, CALCIUM DISODIUM ETA (ugh!), natural flavors, etc.
Not mention that homemade mayo tastes well...like real mayo and that it’s so delicious.
Homemade mayonnaise is an entirely different species when compared to store-bought mayo. Creamy, rich, flavorful, so quick and easy to make - it literally takes 1 minute.

Homemade (Paleo) Mayonnaise




So why not everyone makes mayonnaise at home?
Well, one concern that people have about making mayonnaise is the fact that you have to use raw eggs.
I remember my mom warning me to “Never eat homemade mayo or you might get salmonella!
Though getting sick from raw eggs is rare — especially if you are using farm fresh pasture raised eggs — salmonella outbreaks are fairly common, and most of the time they have to do with eating raw eggs.
Mom was right, after all.

Homemade (Paleo) Mayonnaise


Times have changed though, and now you can buy pasteurized eggs almost anywhere; not to mention that there are several techniques to pasteurize eggs at home.
So there you have it, no more excuses not to make mayo at home.
I thought it was possible that if I needed a reminder, you might need a reminder too.

Homemade (Paleo) Mayonnaise


Homemade (Paleo) Mayonnaise                                                                                    Print this recipe!

A couple of notes. Do not use extra virgin olive oil but instead use a light tasting olive oil, or a mild tasting oil such as walnut oil. Extra virgin olive oil is too strongly flavored to make a good mayonnaise.
As for the technique, you can use a blender, a food processor, a hand mixer or your soon to be sore hand and a whisk. I prefer using the hand mixer instead of the blender/food processor because my blender/food processor gets hot quickly which can mess up the emulsification process.

Ingredients
Yields about 1 ¼ cup

2 egg yolks (use pasteurized eggs if you're concerned about raw eggs)
3 teaspoons lemon juice (or vinegar)
1 cup olive oil (use light tasting olive oil)
1 teaspoon mustard (optional)
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

In a medium glass bowl mix the yolks, lemon juice, and mustard if using.
Start whisking vigorously (blender or food processor on low) while dripping the oil very slowly, even drop by drop in the beginning.
BE PATIENT, you’re creating an emulsion and if you put too much oil at once, it will separate and will be very hard to save.
When the mixture begins to emulsify (or thicken), you can be a bit faster about pouring in the oil but still take your time. There’s no rush.
When all the oil is incorporated and the mayonnaise is thick you can season to taste with salt and pepper.
Keep leftovers in the refrigerator.

Nutrition facts

One tablespoon yields 92 calories, 10 grams of fat, 0 grams of carbs, and 0 grams of protein.

31 comments:

  1. I love mayonnaise! how long does it keep for? would be great to know exactly what's in my mayo apposed to shop bought xx

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    1. I keep mine approximately 7-8 days in an air tight container in the refrigerator (sometimes even longer!) I go by smell and visual if I'm not sure...

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  2. I've tried this a few times, but only really got it to emulsify once. I think I was impatient with the 'drip, drip, drip' part of it, but the one time it came together was so satisfying! I'll have to try it again since I've been eating egg salad sandwiches like they're going out of style! :-)

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    1. The drip, drip, drip part is non-negotiable. It takes just a bit of patience...

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  3. Ridiculously easy and so much better for you. Love this, Mike!

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  4. Super easy basic recipe! Will be making soon for sure!

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  5. Mike, beautiful photography - love the color of your homemade mayo - I just know that it is delicious. Whenever I prepare food for us and the recipe calls for raw eggs, I always make sure to buy the best organic ones I can put my hands on. Fabulous recipe - we all need a reminder every once in a while!
    Have a nice week - it seems that spring has just arrived in our part of the world and it felt good to be outside today
    Andrrea

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    1. Thank you so much Andrea, I hope you're having a great week too!

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  6. Homemade mayo is the only way to go! I'm really not that fond of store-bought (rather go without most times) but I can eat the homemade version by the spoonful!

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  7. These photos almost - almost, makes me want to try mayonnaise again. They are beautiful and the recipe is a no brainer, easy one, right? I just have never been a fan of the stuff. Mustard man here, but it sure looks good. OK, I will try it....

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    1. If you don't like it, you don't have to try it, that's OK we can still be buddies! ;)

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  8. Hi Mike, your homemade mayo looks amazing, I bet it is so much better than store bought.

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    1. It really is better than store bought, you have to try it!

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  9. Looks so much better than anything one can get at a store... now, one of my Paleo cookbooks insists that making homemade mayo is the ONLY situation in which getting those pre squeezed lemon juice things at the grocery store (you know, the disgusting lemon juice in the plastic lemon containers) is the way to go.

    something about those having the correct level of acidity that may or may not be found in real lemon juice.

    I wonder if you have any thoughts on it - I never bought those juices, but I must say that cookbook author seems to know what she's talking about... so I am a bit conflicted

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    1. I hate per-squeezed lemon juice, like I really hate it. Using freshly squeezed lemon juice (or vinegar) always works out for me so I'll stick to my guns!

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    2. Totally agree with you, and was a bit surprised by that recipe and her recommendation. OH, well - I will stick with my (and yours) modus operandi. Fresh fruit it is. Plastic is out. With a bang!

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  10. My mum told me the exact same thing- Yet I still did it (hello cookie dough). Love making homemade mayo, and even the ones here claiming to be 'clean' have 100000 ingredients in them.

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    1. I haven't mentioned cookie dough, one of the most awesome things made with raw eggs!

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  11. Riddle me this, Alpha: what are 'natural flavors'? Those two little words on the back of containers scare me. Ok, so maybe they don't scare me as much as all of the things I can't pronounce, but still...what the HECK are natural flavors?? Either way, I'm loving the homemade mayo. We don't use mayo that much around here, but when we do I need it to be tasty! But I have to say that I'm disappointed you didn't make this with a whisk and some good ole muscle grease. That would have helped you train...not sure exactly how, but I'm sure it would have helped somehow. #WolfpackKitchenWorkout

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    1. Do you know that "natural flavor" is the fourth most common ingredient listed on labels. The only ingredients that outrank it: salt, water and sugar.
      They're used to provide the taste and make the food more appealing. But just like artificial flavors they're made in a lab though they're derived from natural ingredients.
      I've read tons of articles/researches about natural flavors but it's still pretty blurry to me

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    2. Ugh, it's like franken-ingredients. "Natural flavors" my left buttcheek. You know what's natural? This legit mayo recipe. I say Mike starts bottling it and selling it with the wolfpack brand.

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    3. "Wolkpack Mayo. So good you'll lick your paws!"
      Sounds like a good catchphrase?

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  12. I love mayo and feel pretty brazen about eating raw eggs in other things too - like chocolate mousse or something like that hehe

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  13. I can memorize a recipe, I can recreate recipes just from tasting, I can rescue a doomed recipe...but homemade mayonnaise continues to be the bane of my existence. Mike, I'm sure that you're a lovely person and very likeable, however I promised myself that I would smack the next person who said that making mayonnaise is "simple"...and I never break my promises so, duck.

    Now, back to my other culinary prowess! When my emulsification, that luxurious undulation of creamy goodness inevitably breaks and I find myself facing soup, I have a fix. I place the entire mixture into a double boiler, start cold and turn the heat on to medium and whisk constantly. When the thermometer reaches 140 degrees I raise the heat slightly until the mixture begins to thicken. I take my hand blender and whip it up again adding vinegar and spices to create a lovely creamy remoulade. It isn't as thick as mayonnaise but it's delicious on everything I put mayo on (and I put mayo on eighty percent of what I eat)! Keep that in your back pocket in case you need it!

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  14. Looks lovely! I'm going to be making chicken salad and I think I may have to use this recipe.

    I have a question which is better, dry mustard powder or do you use a preffered pre-mixed mustard of your choosing -if- you use it?

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  15. Looks so delicious!! And I'm not going to feel guilty for saying, "YES. I love mayonnaise"..........

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  16. I constantly make mayo myself and have been doing so for a long, long time. It is just so much better than the storebought stuff... (also, add garlic and you have an awesome aioli <3)

    However, I use a stick blender instead and it is much, much easier than the drip-drip-dripping... Just a tip. ;)

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  17. Nice recipe, Mike.
    I love mayo and have few recipes for it. I usually use sunflower oil when making it - with lemon and little bit of salt it taste just perfect :)

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